Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

Save the California Gray Whale

February 10, 2009

 

 

Yes we can

nuzzling

Save the California Gray Whale

February 9, 2009

Sue Arnold CEO of the California Gray Whale Coalition and Coordinator of Australians for Animals writes the following from the AFA November newsletter. Sue is currently in the USA campaigning to save the California Gray Whale.

www.australiansforanimals.org.au

info@californiagraywhalecoaltion.org

 

Norm’s links to Santa Barbara all these years later are still strong.
One of his oldest friends, Marc McGinnes, is also an academic
at UCSB. On a trip to Australia a few years ago, he visited with
us and of course, I told him about the plight of the Gray Whale.

 

Marc, being the lovely man he is, went to battle for the Gray
Whale back home and arranged meetings with Santa Barbara
conservation groups when we spent some time in the US a few
years ago.

When we were looking for a California politician to sponsor
the Resolution on the Gray Whale, one of the most likely
Assembly members who might sponsor a Resolution turned out
to be Pedro Nava from Santa Barbara. And guess who knows
Pedro Nava pretty well. Marc McGinnes. Marc got on the phone and the
Internet and urged a humongous number of Santa Barbara
citizens to call, write and email Pedro asking him to sponsor the
Resolution.

Marc’s unfailing support has been critical in the historic
efforts made by the Coalition. When I met with Pedro Nava
this year in Sacramento, Norm was with me . Pedro
remembered the incredible campaign Norm waged. There
was a moment of the circle coming together – as it so often
does for the whales.

Thankyou, dearest Norm.

Thankyou dear Marc, and

 

Thankyou, Pedro.

 

On Mom

 

 

Save the California Gray Whale

February 4, 2009

 

Sue Arnold CEO of the California Gray Whale Coalition and Coordinator of Australians for Animals writes the following from the AFA November newsletter. Sue is currently in the USA campaigning to save the California Gray Whale.

www.australiansforanimals.org.au

info@californiagraywhalecoaltion.org

 

ATHANKYOU TO MY HUSBAND, FORMER
SENATOR NORM SANDERS.

You all know how co-incidences and synergy work. That’s when
Spirit joins the campaign, so many amazing things happen.
Often it’s about tracing back the human connections.

So here goes. My beloved husband, Norm Sanders, (who
was one of the Senators on the historic Senate Select
Committee on Animal Welfare), used to be a Professor at the
University of California, Santa Barbara. (UCSB) Whilst
teaching there, he took on the oil industry who were intent on
destroying the precious marine environment of the Santa
Barbara Channel and made a name for himself which still
draws awe and amazement at the fight he put up, supported by his
students and almost the entire influential community of Santa
Barbara.

Norm’s links to Santa Barbara all these years later are still strong.
One of his oldest friends, Marc McGinnes, is also an academic
at UCSB. On a trip to Australia a few years ago, he visited with
us and of course, I told him about the plight of the Gray Whale.

open mouth

 

Save the California Gray Whale

February 4, 2009

Sue Arnold CEO of the California Gray Whale Coalition and Coordinator of Australians for Animals writes the following from the AFA November newsletter. Sue is currently in the USA campaigning to save the California Gray Whale.

www.australiansforanimals.org.au

info@californiagraywhalecoaltion.org

 

Bottom line, the wheels are in motion for a Resolution to go to
the US Congress which will call on the new Administration to
properly fund a comprehensive review of all the threats facing
the Gray Whale and if warranted, to relist the whales
under the Endangered Species Act.

Sue Arnold is a Board Member of Sea Sanctuary Inc., a grass
roots San Francisco group which has helped AFA many times in
the past. A meeting of the Board whilst Sue was in San
Francisco resolved to help in every way possible. Board
members will be able to personally lobby California
Congress members to support the Resolution in Congress.

As well, Sue met with a public relations firm to see whether it
might be possible to set up a California wide campaign.
The principal of the firm has some great ideas but everything
will now hinge on whether there is a recovery in the money world
– which at the moment isn’t looking too good. Specially in
the US. Funding will unquestionably dry up for many
charities and non-government groups unfortunately.

 

pink mouth

 

 

Save the California Gray Whale

February 3, 2009

 

Sue Arnold CEO of the California Gray Whale Coalition and Coordinator of Australians for Animals writes the following from the AFA November newsletter. Sue is currently in the USA campaigning to save the California Gray Whale.

www.australiansforanimals.org.au

info@californiagraywhalecoaltion.org

Our Coordinator had meetings with the Center for Biological
Diversity who run most of the public interest legal challenges
in the US for major environmental issues. One of the
Center’s most experienced environmental lawyers is also
working on the Gray Whale.

The sharing of information between our two groups is
extremely useful. We expect with the combination of the
Coalition’s campaign to raise public awareness and push
through the political system, that the Center’s anticipated legal
challenges on the Gray Whale will make for a very effective
strategy.

As well, our Coordinator had a long meeting with Professor
Stephen Palumbi from Stanford University whose research and
support of the Gray Whale has been critical to the Çoalition.

 

profile breach

 

 

 

Save the California Gray Whale

February 1, 2009

Sue Arnold CEO of the California Gray Whale Coalition and Coordinator of Australians for Animals writes the following from the AFA November newsletter. Sue is currently in the USA campaigning to save the California Gray Whale.

www.australiansforanimals.org.au

info@californiagraywhalecoaltion.org

 

 

So being a foreigner sometimes works. Most Americans are
pretty friendly to Australians.

Our Coordinator had meetings with the Center for Biological
Diversity who run most of the public interest legal challenges
in the US for major environmental issues. One of the
Center’s most experienced environmental lawyers is also
working on the Gray Whale.

The sharing of information between our two groups is
extremely useful. We expect with the combination of the
Coalition’s campaign to raise public awareness and push
through the political system, that the Center’s anticipated legal
challenges on the Gray Whale will make for a very effective
strategy.

As well, our Coordinator had a long meeting with Professor
Stephen Palumbi from Stanford University whose research and
support of the Gray Whale has been critical to the Coalition.

Bottom line, the wheels are in motion for a Resolution to go to
the US Congress which will call on the new Administration to
properly fund a comprehensive review of all the threats facing
the Gray Whale and if warranted, to relist the whales
under the Endangered Species Act.

 

Reflecting eye

 

 

 

Save the California Gray Whale

February 1, 2009

 

Sue Arnold CEO of the California Gray Whale Coalition and Coordinator of Australians for Animals writes the following blog from the USA while campaigning to save the California Gray Whale.

Today I heard news of the Gray whale, news which I have feared would be
the reality.   At least ten per cent of the current migration is
emaciated, skinny, starving.   The migration is not yet in full swing and
already the numbers of emaciated whales is very high.  Who knows what the
eventual percentage will be but given the collapse of the Arctic ecosystem
on which the Gray whales depend for their food, the predictions are dire.
Yesterday I flew to San Diego and held meetings with key Coalition
members, some of whom are whale watching companies.  Everyone is worried
about the whales, there’s also major concern over the level of industrial
and people development which is planned along the gray whales migration
route.

In Mexico, in the birthing lagoons, huge plans are in place for
development via roads, hotels, apartments, places you could never imagine
would be built in such a wilderness.  Baja is the escape place for many
Americans, the cost of living is much lower and the climate kinder.  But
Baja is a desert, there’s very limited water and a limited infrastructure.
In the World Heritage Vizcaino Reserve where the San Ignacio Laguna is
found, there’s even plans to develop the area, one of the most incredible
wildernesses on the face of the earth.
The starvation of Gray whales is a symptom of sick oceans and greater
starvation for all marine life dependent on healthy marine ecosystems.
Humanity needs healthy oceans to survive.
Starving whales are a precursor of starving humans, what happens to the
creatures of the Earth is the fate of humanity unless we change our ways.

 

Rick

Save the California Gray Whale

January 29, 2009

 

Sue Arnold CEO of the California Gray Whale Coalition and Coordinator of Australians for Animals writes the following from the AFA November newsletter. Sue is currently in the USA campaigning to save the California Gray Whale.

www.australiansforanimals.org.au

info@californiagraywhalecoaltion.org

“Are there Gray Whales in Australia?” A question our
Coordinator was often asked. Gov. Schwarzenegger, aka the
Terminator, is a Republican. But he’s no ordinary Republican,
many Americans think he’s the greenest Governor in the entire
United States. Staff in his office are also very supportive of the
Coalition and say the Governor would almost certainly take part
in any major event we hold for the Gray Whale.

Although it has been incredibly difficult to lobby the California
Assembly and Senate as an Australian, there seems to be an
advantage in many respects. Not holding any Party
affiliations helps. Because the Gray Whale is so controversial
–the greatest threats to its existence being the oil and gas
industry and the Makah Native American Indian tribe’s efforts
to begin killing these whales, many US conservation groups
refuse to campaign to save the Gray Whales.

 

Rick 008

 

Save the California Gray Whale

January 29, 2009

Sue Arnold Coordinator for Australians for Animals and CEO of the California Gray Whale Coalition is currently in the USA campaigning for the California Gray Whale.

The information below is taken from the November issue of the Australians for Animals newsletter.

www.australiansforanimals.org.au

info@californiagraywhalecoaltion.org

 

 

CRITICAL MEETINGS WITH LEADING US
POLITICIANS

With meetings set up with staffers from the offices of
Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger, Democrat
Senators Boxer, Feinstein and the Speaker of the US Congress,
Nancy Pelosi, the charity had some optimism. Senator
Barbara Boxer is very influential, she is Chairperson of
the Senate Committee on the Environment and a very
powerful Senator with a long history of support for whale
conservation.

Her staffers were very supportive and indicated the
willingness of the Senator to follow through with the
campaign. Nancy Pelosi, as Speaker of the House, is the third
most important politician in the country, her staff couldn’t have
been more helpful giving strategy ideas and pledging help.

It was difficult getting past the security to her office as an Aussie

and there was a moment when the Deputy Director
almost gasped in astonishment when  she realised our
Coordinator was Australian.

 

Yes We Can! Save the California Gray Whale. Join the Fan Club today.

 

info@californiagraywhalecoaltion.org

 

 

 

 

Rick 009

 

Save the California Gray Whale

January 28, 2009

 

Sue Arnold CEO of the California Gray Whale Coalition and Coordinator of Australians for Animals writes the following blog from the USA while campaigning to save the California Gray Whale.

www.australiansforanimals.org.au

info@californiagraywhalecoaltion.org

Its a nice feeling to arrive in San Francisco and see that President Obama
is moving fast on climate change.  The winds of progress are definitely
blowing in the US and the environment is coming up for airing at last.
Gray whale work is as always, fascinating.   A group of Coalition members
have a meeting with a Californian congress member on Monday, a key meeting
which will be critically important in the journey to relisting the Gray
Whale under the US Endangered Species Act.

So far no word as to how the migration is going and whether there are more
or less whales than last year.   At this time, the migration is usually
led by heavily pregnant whales, some with newborn young born along the way
to Baja, Mexico.   They’re followed by the juveniles and finally the
males.   On their way to Mexico the whales don’t spend much time playing
but are focused on their journey.     When they blow ( which they do
often) and if you’re in seeing distance, its a heart shape blow which
glistens rainbow colours in the sunlight.

ON the way back, the journey is far more hazardous with newborn calves
swimming close to their mother’s side as the whales sneak through the kelp
beds close to shore trying to avoid packs of transient Orcas who can tear
a mother whale and her calf to pieces.  Life in the ocean isn’t a bed of
roses, the predator prey relationship can be as heartbreaking to witness
as the violence of war.   The reality of planet earth is violence and
peace, Nature provides that lesson every day.

 

the kiss